Starting solids with Chelsea Mauch

There are so many exciting “firsts” with your new baby. The introduction of solids is one that can be a lot of fun, but also a little daunting for new parents. Like many things, practice makes perfect, and the more you know about how to approach introducing solids for the first time with your baby, the more confident you will be, and the happier and more relaxed your little one is likely to be.

There’s a sea of information on the internet about starting solids, which can be quite overwhelming! This is why we’d like to simplify the basics in relation to starting solids, with some easy-to-understand tips to get you started.

It’s important your baby can sit upright with some support, and hold their head up

Around 6 months of age, babies are usually ready to start solids. When they’re showing signs of interest in the foods you’re eating, this is an indication that they’re ready to start solid foods. It is also important that they can sit upright with some support, hold their head up steadily and that they have gained some control over their tongue. At this age, your baby’s digestive system and ability to chew and swallow is improving rapidly in readiness for the transition to solids.

Breastfeeding or bottle-feeding should continue while introducing solids

5 steps on how to easily start introducing solids

  • Introducing one new food at a time is a great way to allow your child to slowly explore new tastes for the very first time, and also identify possible allergies.
  • It’s important to remember; all they’ve ever known is breastmilk or formula, so don’t be too worried if they’re a little hesitant to start off with. In fact, it may take 10 to 15 tries of a food before they decide they like it. They’ll become more adventurous as the process starts to become familiar. That’s when the real messy fun starts!
  • The best time to offer your baby solids for the first time is after either breastmilk or formula, starting with small amounts.
  • Smooth foods can be good to start with but texture should be increased over the first few months as their skills develop. Great first foods are cooked and pureed vegetables or fruits, progressing to chunky mashed foods, followed by soft finger foods. Add plain water or their usual milk to pureed or mashed foods if you need to make it a little runnier.
  • There is no need to add salt or sugar to your baby’s food. Remember; they have only had milk so far, and have more tastebuds than an adult, so new flavours on their own are much more exciting to them than they might be to you!

If your baby is approximately 4-6 months old and you’d like to know a little more about how to introduce solid foods, book into one of our “Starting Solids and Nutrition in the First-Year” group education sessions.

Each two-hour group education session includes:

  • Starting solids (what, when, how) from the very first purees, through to lumps and finger foods
  • Nutrition for babies and how to encourage healthy eating
  • Developing your baby’s palate
  • Preparing food for babies
  • Extensive written resources including recipes and food preparation methods

This group session is currently held monthly online and booked through our Mile End – SuperGym.

For more information or to book into a group session:

P: 08 7123 6147
E: reception@adelaidepaediatrics.com.au

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